Imagine visiting your mother or father at the nursing home and seeing strange marks on their skin.  Discovering these bedsores can be stressful and can cause confusion about what to do.  Bedsores can become extremely painful and even require extensive surgery if left untreated. 

A patient’s bedsores are a sign of neglect and knowing how to deal them is vital. A caregiver’s priority to someone who is enduring bedsores is to stop the neglect and restore their well-being. Holding medical staff responsible helps remedy the ailment which begins with seeking proper support.

So, what do you do? Performing the two steps below can save your loved one’s life and help compensate them for the cost inflicted by their pain and suffering.

1. Alert the nursing staff or attending physician immediately.

Your love one’s health is priority and alerting staff as soon as possible can prevent serious injury. (Click here for more information on preventing bedsores.) Do not be afraid to be persistent. Staff members may be difficult to deal with because the damages caused by bedsores may be extremely costly to the medical facilities, or they do not want to be held accountable. Nursing homes may even try to transfer your loved one out of their care to reduce liability. To prevent further suffering, promptly notify the nursing home staff.

2. Talk to a lawyer.

Do not wait until the worst happens. Unfortunately, many families contact a lawyer after a loved one’s death. Families must be proactive in seeking medical and legal assistance.

If you are uncertain or uneasy about speaking to a medical professional, an attorney can address your loved one’s issue effectively. An attorney can determine if you have a valid lawsuit.

Find out your options and call us for a free consultation.

Edward M. Farmer is a U.S. Army veteran and attorney. A majority of his career has been dedicated to assisting veterans.  More information regarding Edward and his law firm can be found at www.vetlawoffice.com

The material and information contained on these pages and on any pages linked from these pages are intended to provide general information only and not legal advice. You should consult with an attorney licensed to practice in your jurisdiction before relying upon any of the information presented here.